Sailboat

Tarpon and Lightning Class

It is hard to believe that this class at one time was reduced to eight wooden boats. It was the introduction of the fiberglass version of these boats by six members in 1979 which saved the fleet.

Today’s “lightning class” design was adopted by the Club in 1946. They were wooden boats built to the American design of 1938 by Olin Stephens. By 6 June 1947 the new One Design Class later to be known as the “Tarpon” Class, was approved with each boat bearing a name beginning with the letter ‘T’.

Whether you're more interested in how a boat looks or how it behaves, it's hard to beat this Class. The Class maintains an attitude that promotes conservative innovation, making the boat faster, safer and more maintenance free, while keeping prices affordable. Most boats in this class that were built in the last 25 years can be made competitive and it's not uncommon, to see them winning races right along with the new ones.

Hobie Class

The Hobie Class has adopted the Hobie cat motto 'Life's too short to sail slow, keep flying a hull’. It could also include, 'the more the merrier' as its motto as the class now welcomes even more members, regardless of experience.

Introduced as the bigger Hobie 14, the Hobie 16 revolutionized the multihull scene when it first appeared in 1971. Forty plus years later, this boat continues to attract great sailors. Powerful enough for the world champion, yet forgiving enough for the novice. It's a dual trapeze boat; fit for a crew of two or more members, can also be sailed in strong winds.

The Hobie 16 sails well in all conditions but excels in breezy and wavy conditions. Originally designed to sail in the surf right off the beach, the 16 still is one of the best catamarans on the market for sailing off the beach. In breezes over 15 knots the 16 provides an exciting ride. It is the ideal boat for off the beach and offshore sailing. Its large sail coupled with the light winds of Lagos enables excellent racing and fun cruising.